3 ways for a higher return from your job hunt

You're pushing your resume out there like a sidewalk salesperson pushing an iPad in your face to donate to ASPCA. Maybe you set a goal for yourself to send out 30 resumes per week, and you're not letting up steam until you can hit that quota. But few people are biting. What's the deal with that? 

 

I'm going to share an overused but very true piece of advice: work smarter, not harder. 

 

Here are three ways to get your professional self out there without peddling on the street waving your resume in everyone's face.

 

1. Budget more time. 

We've all heard that it's better to apply for jobs when you already have a job, but a 9-to-5 makes it challenging to find the time to apply for a new position . Time is limited and motivation wanes at the end of a work day. To tackle this issue, budget chunks of time every day for the job hunt. Research has shown that our brains are most alert and focused before noon, so try making a schedule to wake up an hour or two earlier to concentrate on the tasks at hand to land a job that makes you happy. 

 

2. Leverage your relationships. 

Making connections is one of the optimal ways to get your name and professional brand out there. Not only do face-to-face conversations give you an upper-hand to sell yourself, you have a greater likelihood of hearing about jobs that aren't yet listed on the web. People know more about what's happening internally at a company before it goes public as a job posting. Join professional networking groups (have you tried MeetUp?) or start regularly attending community activities to connect with more people. The more people you meet, more windows of opportunity appear that weren't in sight before. 

 

Don't underestimate the powerful connector platform that is Linkedin. Use the network you've built through your profile to get in touch with people who work in the industry you're looking to transition into or the company you've had your eye on for quite some time. 

 

 

3. Results

In your resume, Linkedin, cover letter, and interview, communicate results. Make sure you share the value you've been able to add to your past positions, but don't forget to communicate what you can deliver to your future employer. You must be able to bridge your strengths with your future company's needs and demonstrate how you can fill the void. 

 

Need help getting started? Get in touch with us to revamp your professional materials so you can feel confident putting yourself out there to land a job that makes you happy. 

 

 Sarah Sax is the founder of Write For The Job. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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