How work and stress are correlated

 Money won't buy you happiness, but it might buy you stress.

 

In a recent U.S. survey published in April, Linkedin discovered that there's a strong correlation between your salary and how stressed you may be. Linkedin asked how stressed Americans were in their jobs, how content they were with their salary and position, and more. The biggest finding: the more you're paid, the more stress you may have.  

 

For example, only 47 percent of people making $35,000 - $50,000 claimed to be stressed at work. Whereas, 68 percent of people making $200,000+ per year admit to being stressed. 

 

Source: Linkedin

The biggest finding: the more you're paid, 
the more stress you may have.

What we also learned is that job satisfaction doesn't necessarily decrease the higher your salary is. People making between $35,000 and $50,000 are least content with their jobs. Once you hit the $51,000 - $75,000 range, 81 percent of professionals say they're satisfied with their position and role. The second "most satisfied" income bracket is $201,000 - $250,000 with 79 percent of workers happy with their jobs. 

 

Source: Linkedin

 

 

Gen X (ages 37-52) admitted that 57 percent of them are stressed at work, but they are the most satisfied with their jobs. 

 

Perhaps to your surprise, the generation least stressed at work are millennials. However, millennials are the most dissatisfied with their jobs. 

 

Linkedin also found that 52 percent of men and 52 percent of women equally feel stressed at work. 

 

When stress is so prevalent in the workforce, it's important to find coping mechanisms that work well for you. Thrive Global offers a myriad of advice to unwind and release tension from your day. Three easy ideas Thrive Global suggests are: exercise, take a real vacation, and find a hobby. 

 

To balance your stress levels, it's important to be in a job that makes you happy. If you're thinking of making a switch, sharpen your professional materials to boost your chances of landing a position you like. Teaming up with Write For The Job is a small investment in your overall happiness. 

 

 

Sarah Sax is the founder of Write For The Job.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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